JAXA Plans Solar Power Plant In Space

May 27, 2014

Picture this: a giant solar power plant floating in space, gathering the sun’s energy with virtually no constraints from the weather, seasons or time of day, delivering a constant supply of green energy to Earth. Sound a little too Sci-Fi? Well, thanks to JAXA, the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, we could actually witness this incredible technology in just over a decade.

The idea of a space power plant has actually been around for a while. Back in 1968, American aerospace engineer Dr. Peter Glaser pioneered the space solar power concept and proposed the deployment of giant solar panels in space in order to generate microwaves that could be transmitted back to Earth to produce electricity. The concept sparked a lot of interest, even from NASA, but it came to a halt in the ‘80s because of the high costs involved. Japan, however, pursued the idea and is currently the world leader of the Space Solar Power Systems (SSPS) project.

This colossal satellite, hovering around 22,000 miles (36,000 kilometers) above Earth, would be several miles long and weigh a whopping 10,000 metric tons. These floating solar panels would actually be tethered to a station on the ground in order to keep the satellite at a fixed point in geostationary orbit. The proposed model also includes a set of mirrors that reflect the sun’s light onto the panels so that when the satellite is not facing the sun it can still receive sunlight.

And now for the really tricky part: getting all of that solar energy back to Earth so that we can use it. There are two possible ways that this could be achieved which involve converting the solar energy into either laser beams or microwaves, or perhaps even a combination of both, which would then be transmitted to a receiving facility (called a “rectenna” [rectifying antenna]) situated on Earth. Ground-based experiments are currently underway to discern which option would be most efficient.

These space based solar panels would be around 5-10 times more efficient than ground-based solar conversion systems. Furthermore, CO2 emissions will be low and will only come from the receiving facility. It’s predicted that SSPS will be able to process around 1 gigawatt of power, which is a similar amount to nuclear power stations.

Although Japan are the leading country with regards to making SSPS happen, in reality the costs will be so astronomical that it is likely contributions from other countries will be required before we see this behemoth space power station start to take shape. This concept may seem a little far-fetched, but JAXA believe they are getting tantalizingly close to turning this vision into a reality.

Check out JAXA’s SSPS YouTube video to find out more:

Read more at http://www.iflscience.com/technology/japan-wants-put-giant-solar-farm-space#sjWyYpropCur1eeA.99

Picture this: a giant solar power plant floating in space, gathering the sun’s energy with virtually no constraints from the weather, seasons or time of day, delivering a constant supply of green energy to Earth. Sound a little too Sci-Fi? Well, thanks to JAXA, the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, we could actually witness this incredible technology in just over a decade.

The idea of a space power plant has actually been around for a while. Back in 1968, American aerospace engineer Dr. Peter Glaser pioneered the space solar power concept and proposed the deployment of giant solar panels in space in order to generate microwaves that could be transmitted back to Earth to produce electricity. The concept sparked a lot of interest, even from NASA, but it came to a halt in the ‘80s because of the high costs involved. Japan, however, pursued the idea and is currently the world leader of the Space Solar Power Systems (SSPS) project.

This colossal satellite, hovering around 22,000 miles (36,000 kilometers) above Earth, would be several miles long and weigh a whopping 10,000 metric tons. These floating solar panels would actually be tethered to a station on the ground in order to keep the satellite at a fixed point in geostationary orbit. The proposed model also includes a set of mirrors that reflect the sun’s light onto the panels so that when the satellite is not facing the sun it can still receive sunlight.

And now for the really tricky part: getting all of that solar energy back to Earth so that we can use it. There are two possible ways that this could be achieved which involve converting the solar energy into either laser beams or microwaves, or perhaps even a combination of both, which would then be transmitted to a receiving facility (called a “rectenna” [rectifying antenna]) situated on Earth. Ground-based experiments are currently underway to discern which option would be most efficient.

These space based solar panels would be around 5-10 times more efficient than ground-based solar conversion systems. Furthermore, CO2 emissions will be low and will only come from the receiving facility. It’s predicted that SSPS will be able to process around 1 gigawatt of power, which is a similar amount to nuclear power stations.

Although Japan are the leading country with regards to making SSPS happen, in reality the costs will be so astronomical that it is likely contributions from other countries will be required before we see this behemoth space power station start to take shape. This concept may seem a little far-fetched, but JAXA believe they are getting tantalizingly close to turning this vision into a reality.

Check out JAXA’s SSPS YouTube video to find out more:

Read more at http://www.iflscience.com/technology/japan-wants-put-giant-solar-farm-space#sjWyYpropCur1eeA.99

Picture this: a giant solar power plant floating in space, gathering the sun’s energy with virtually no constraints from the weather, seasons or time of day, delivering a constant supply of green energy to Earth. Sound a little too Sci-Fi? Well, thanks to JAXA, the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, we could actually witness this incredible technology in just over a decade.

The idea of a space power plant has actually been around for a while. Back in 1968, American aerospace engineer Dr. Peter Glaser pioneered the space solar power concept and proposed the deployment of giant solar panels in space in order to generate microwaves that could be transmitted back to Earth to produce electricity. The concept sparked a lot of interest, even from NASA, but it came to a halt in the ‘80s because of the high costs involved. Japan, however, pursued the idea and is currently the world leader of the Space Solar Power Systems (SSPS) project.

This colossal satellite, hovering around 22,000 miles (36,000 kilometers) above Earth, would be several miles long and weigh a whopping 10,000 metric tons. These floating solar panels would actually be tethered to a station on the ground in order to keep the satellite at a fixed point in geostationary orbit. The proposed model also includes a set of mirrors that reflect the sun’s light onto the panels so that when the satellite is not facing the sun it can still receive sunlight.

And now for the really tricky part: getting all of that solar energy back to Earth so that we can use it. There are two possible ways that this could be achieved which involve converting the solar energy into either laser beams or microwaves, or perhaps even a combination of both, which would then be transmitted to a receiving facility (called a “rectenna” [rectifying antenna]) situated on Earth. Ground-based experiments are currently underway to discern which option would be most efficient.

These space based solar panels would be around 5-10 times more efficient than ground-based solar conversion systems. Furthermore, CO2 emissions will be low and will only come from the receiving facility. It’s predicted that SSPS will be able to process around 1 gigawatt of power, which is a similar amount to nuclear power stations.

Although Japan are the leading country with regards to making SSPS happen, in reality the costs will be so astronomical that it is likely contributions from other countries will be required before we see this behemoth space power station start to take shape. This concept may seem a little far-fetched, but JAXA believe they are getting tantalizingly close to turning this vision into a reality.

Read more at http://www.iflscience.com/technology/japan-wants-put-giant-solar-farm-space#sjWyYpropCur1eeA.99

The idea of a solar power plant in space has actually been around since 1968, American aerospace engineer Dr. Peter Glaser pioneered the space solar power concept and proposed the deployment of giant solar panels in space in order to generate microwaves that could be transmitted back to Earth to produce electricity. The concept sparked a lot of interest, even from NASA, but it came to a halt in the ‘80s because of the high costs involved. Japan, however, pursued the idea and is currently the world leader of the Space Solar Power Systems (SSPS) project.

The plan is to build a giant satellite, hovering around 22,000 miles (36,000 kilometers) above Earth, it would be several miles long and weigh around 10,000 metric tons. Floating solar panels would be tethered to a station on the ground in order to keep the satellite at a fixed point in geostationary orbit. The proposed model also includes a set of mirrors that reflect the sun’s light onto the panels so that when the satellite is not facing the sun it can still receive sunlight. Collecting sunlight from outside the Earth’s atmosphere, provides a continuous supply, with almost no influence from the weather, the seasons, or time of day. Since the energy source is the sun, it’s an endlessly renewable resource, Also, because the power is generated in space and carbon dioxide is emitted only at the receiving site, emissions within the Earth’s atmosphere can be greatly reduced, which makes this technology very environmentally friendly.

The more complex part is how to transport that solar energy back to Earth. JAXA is currently conducting ground-based experiments to find the most efficient way to transmit energy. There are two possible ways  this could be achieved either converting the solar energy into  laser beams or microwaves, or perhaps even a combination of both, which would then be transmitted to a receiving facility (called a “rectenna” [rectifying antenna]) situated on Earth. Ground-based experiments are currently underway to discern which option would be most efficient.

When transmitting power by microwaves, a significant technological challenge is how to control the direction, and transmit it with pinpoint accuracy from a geostationary orbit to a receiving site on the ground. Japan currently has the most advanced technology to do this but transmitting microwaves from an altitude of 36,000 kilometers to a flat surface 3 km in diameter is like threading a needle from space.

There are many other technological challenges to solve before SSPS can be implemented. However, in principle, it is getting close to the stage where it is feasible. Researchers have started preparation for the world’s first demonstration of 1kW-class wireless power transmission technology, and are aiming for practical use in the 2030s. It’s predicted that SSPS will be able to process around 1 gigawatt of power, which is a similar amount to nuclear power stations.

Although Japan is the leading country with regards to making SSPS happen, in reality the costs will be so astronomical that it is likely contributions from other countries will be required before we see this behemoth space power station start to take shape however, JAXA believe they are getting tantalizingly close to turning this vision into a reality.

 

Sources: JAXA, Japan Space Systems, iflscience.com

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Tornado strikes Japan as Meterological Agency unveils new warning system

September 4, 2013

As the typhoon season reaches its peak in Japan, local inhabitants of Saitama and Chiba were surprised on Monday afternoon by a freak tornado which injured over 60 people and wrecked over 100 buildings.

The tornado began in Koshigaya, Saitama Prefecture, injuring 63 people and wrecking  buildings before going on a 14-km rampage into neighboring Chiba, local police said. It swept through houses and fields around 2 p.m., knocking down utility poles, peeling off roofs and sending debris into the air. According to local police one man’s skull was fractured by an object sent flying by the tornado. In Koshigaya, seven buildings were destroyed and another 100 severely damaged. About 4,000 households were also left without power by the twister.

Based on police data from the two prefectures, the tornado wreaked havoc along a 13.8-km stretch, touching down in Koshigaya before veering northeast toward the town of Matsubushi and heading to Noda, Chiba Prefecture. In Matsubushi, the roofs of 10 houses were ripped off but no injuries were reported. In Noda, however, the twister damaged 27 cars, the roofs of 68 houses and knocked out power to about 6,200 households.

The Japan Meteorological Agency reported that the tornadoes were likely caused by a thundercloud called a “supercell,” which has generated mega tornadoes in the United States and elsewhere in the past,

Meanwhile, the Agency also announced on Aug. 30 that in a response to an increase in severe weather events they had started a “special warning” (tokubetsu keiho) designation for natural disasters that are very likely to cause heavy damage. As Mr. Mitsuhiko Hatori, director general of the agency, said, a special warning means that a life or death situation is imminent. Once such a warning is issued, the general public and local governments must think that a life-threatening situation is approaching and take necessary action — that is, evacuate quickly to minimize the possibility of disaster-related casualties.

Special warnings will be issued for heavy rains, storms, high tides, high waves, heavy snow and blizzards. But the agency will continue to use the conventional terms “emergency earthquake early warning” (kinkyu jishin sokuho) for an earthquake whose intensity is six or higher on the Japanese scale of seven, “eruption warning” (funka keiho) for a volcanic eruption that requires evacuation and “major tsunami warning” (o-tsunami keiho) for a tsunami that is more than three meters high. The agency said that these conventional terms are on a par with special warnings.

In the case of heavy rains, a special warning will be issued for each municipality when a record heavy rain for the past 50 years is imminent. The agency has set a criterion for issuing a special heavy rain warning by studying past precipitation records, including precipitation for three hours periods and for 48 hour periods, in individual municipalities across the country.

From the rainy season to autumn, people watch for a special heavy rain warning, due to climate change localized heavy rains are occurring more frequently in Japan nowadays. In the past month, record heavy rains hit the Tohoku and Chugoku regions, causing casualties. If the new criteria are applied, these heavy rains have been strong enough to merit the issuance of special warnings. At that time, the agency called on local residents to “immediately take an action that protects your life.” But it turned out that the call came too late for some areas — after the peak of heavy rains passed. The agency now plans to improve the accuracy of its weather forecast so that future special warnings will be issued in a more timely manner.


Heat Wave Seeps Japan

August 13, 2013

Japan remained in the grip of a severe heat wave as the temperature in Shimanto, Kochi Prefecture, broke the national record of 41C.

The new high, logged at 1:42 p.m, on Monday, topped the previous record of 40.9 set in Kumagaya, Saitama Prefecture, and Tajimi, Gifu Prefecture, in August 2007.

The heat is expected to continue for about a week amid sunny weather, officials said.

Among the Meteorological Agency’s 927 observation points across Japan, 185 logged highs above 35.

Nightfall has offered little relief. In the Otemachi business district in central Tokyo, the temperature stayed as high as 30.4 late into the evening Sunday, the agency said.

Atmospheric conditions became unstable Sunday afternoon in the Kanto-Koshin region, prompting the Meteorological Agency to issue an alert about possible tornados.

At least four people died Sunday of causes related to the hot weather, according to police and fire departments.

Around 8:50 a.m., an 80-year-old woman was found lying in her house in Arita, Wakayama Prefecture. She was transported to a hospital but was confirmed dead about an hour later.

The woman lived alone and did not use an air conditioner, firefighters said.

The Wakayama Local Meteorological Observatory reported a high of 38.5 degrees in the city of Wakayama. The previous record there was 38.1 degrees marked in 1994.

Sources used include BBC News and Japan Times.

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Huge iceberg breaks off from the West Antarctic Ice Sheet

July 10, 2013

A iceberg thought to be eight times the size of New York’s Manhattan Island has broken off a glacier in the Antarctic.

The huge block of ice measures approximately 720 square kilometres, and broke away from the Pine Island glacier (PIG), located at the most western edge of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet. A rapidly-expanding fissure spreading across the surface of the glacier was first noted in 2011 by a NASA plane flying over the region, and since then, the PIG has been under close scrutiny as scientists waited for the iceberg to break off completely.

Despite the Antarctic being shrouded in permanent darkness during its winter months, scientists have been able to track the progress of the massive fissure and confirm the iceberg’s separation from the glacier, using the German TerraSAR-X satellite. This technology has the ability to detect the movements of the PIG’s ice stream, even in pitch darkness and when the Earth is covered by cloud. Using the TerraSAR-X satellite, scientists have been logging details of the iceberg’s split, in order to determine exactly how and why the glacier was driven forward through the Antarctic, and why the fissure was caused. With such information, they hope to come to a better understanding of how the Antarctic is changing, and how it will look in the future.

Professor Angelika Humbert, a glaciologist at the Alfred Wegener Institute, said of the iceberg: “We were very keen to see how the crack propagated. We need proper calving laws, to be able to describe the evolution of ice sheets over centuries.

Whilst such glacial splits are natural and are not automatically assumed to be a by-product of climate change, which is affecting the West Atlantic Ice Sheet (in fact similar splits occurred in 2001 and 2007), the PIG is of particular concern to scientists such as Humbert.

Satellite readings have revealed a drastic thinning in the thickness of the PIG in recent years, and it has been confirmed that this particular glacier is the most rapidly shrinking glacier on the planet, causing great concern to glaciologists across the globe. This extreme ice loss is thought to be due to a rise in the temperature of the water around and under the glacier, which contributes to the melting of the ice shelf. The PIG is of particular concern as it drains up to 10 per cent of all the ice flowing off the west of the continent, and as such, its melting contributes to the rise in sea levels much more significantly than any other one of the world’s glaciers.

Scientists will now wait to see just how long it takes for the iceberg to float away from the glacier and begin to move out of the bay in front of it, a process which could take several months.

Sources include BBC News

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TJC offers an extensive global network of professional & experienced multilingual translators, proof-readers and interpreters. We also have academic researchers, specialists and speakers, who are all native speakers of over 180 languages. At TJC Global, we are committed to helping the effort to reduce global warming. Our expert translators can assist you in research for the carbon market and communication with foreign companies to support the process. For further information about what we can offer your organization, please visit our website or contact us. You can also visit our sister site for professional Japanese translation and interpretation services.

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The future looks bright for Fukushima farmers

June 27, 2013

Farmers in Fukushima are turning to “solar sharing,” a process by which they can generate solar power on the same land as they already grow crops. This process will allow them to sell solar power for use on the national grid, via utility companies.

This is certainly a novel enterprise. Fukushima’s farming industry was badly affected by last year’s nuclear accident. The regions farmers are hoping to sell the power to help cover the losses they have suffered due to the nuclear accident at the Tokyo Electric Power Company’s Fukushima nuclear plant. It is believed that most of the farmers will invest the money generated from the sale of the electric power into improving their existing arable land. The ‘solar sharing’ process is in principle really rather simple: solar panels are erected on poles over existing arable land. In order to ensure a sufficient volume of light reaches the crops underneath, the amount of light that reaches the soil is carefully controlled by tilting the position of the solar panels according to the position of the daytime sun. It is, to put it simply, a sort of mechanical ‘sunflower effect.’

Solar sharing was first used in 2004, in Chiba prefecture, and then spread to other prefectures, including Aichi, Mie and Ibaraki. Due to a government scheme introduced last July, electric power companies are now obliged to buy power generated by renewable energy sources at fixed prices. However, the government have set conditions for farmers wanting to participate in the scheme. Importantly, they must continue to cultivate the land itself, and the annual crop yield of the arable land must not fall below 80% of the regional average. This is to prevent farmers from abandoning farming and using the government scheme as their primary source of income instead. Rather the scheme is intended as a ‘stop-gap’ for farmers affected by the Fukushima nuclear accident. Ichiro Hirata, a farmer, whose land is being used for the project, said: “Even if shipments from this area resume someday, my crops will not sell for the time being due to groundless rumours of contamination. Until prices recover, I can now cover the loss by selling electric power.”

However, a local government official did counsel caution: “While solar sharing could help our farmers, damage caused by rumours relating to the nuclear accident could drive them out of business before they even get a chance to try it.”

Yet the notion of solar sharing is gaining ground in Japan. The town government of Aizubange is also considering introducing solar sharing. Moreover, farmers in Sendai have also proposed introducing a block solar sharing scheme. Even in Iwate, a local government official said that they had received numerous inquiries from farmers and local agricultural committees enquiring about how to introduce solar sharing.

Michio Sakemoto, Director of Solar Sharing Kyokai, said: “If the projects in Fukushima prefecture prove successful, we want to encourage farmers in all of the disaster-hit areas to introduce the solar sharing method as a way to keep using their farmland in the most effective and productive way.”

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Sources used include: The Japan News and Japan Times

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Solar powered plane to make pioneering trans America flight

May 1, 2013

The Solar Impulse solar-powered airplane made history in 2010 when it embarked on the first-ever solar-powered night flight, and again in 2012 when it made the first intercontinental solar-powered flight (Europe to North Africa)

With a wingspan of 63.4 metres, which is as big as a jumbo jet’s. It weighs no more than a car, with a fuselage is as slender as a glider’s and a cramped single-person cockpit. The wings are covered in almost 12,000 photovoltaic cells, which can simultaneously run  four electrically driven propellers while charging four packs of lithium-polymer batteries. The batteries are needed because the aircraft has to be able to fly through the night.

Swiss co-founders Bertrand Piccard and André Borschberg began working on Solar Impulse in 2003 after a feasibility study at the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology in Lausanne suggested a round-the-world trip by solar airplane would become possible as solar cell power efficiency improved. The idea was not to suggest that aviation should switch to solar power, but rather to use the aircraft as a mobile showcase for solar cell efficiency.

Now the co-founders and pilots of Solar Impulse will  conduct the first solar-powered coast-to-coast United States flight – Solar Impulse Across America – taking flight from May 1st. The Solar Impulse manages a speed of just 64 kilometres per hour so, although it can stay aloft for 36 hours, it will stop over a number of times: at Phoenix, Arizona; at Dallas, Texas; at St Louis, Missouri (or Atlanta, Georgia); and at Washington DC en route to New York City.

A typical flight involves taking off in the early morning, when winds are light, and ascending to 10,000 metres to stay above any storm clouds.  The air is thin at this altitude, though,and an oxygen supply is needed. The pilot has to wear an oxygen mask because pressurising the cockpit is not possible. The team do not want to carry heavy oxygen cylinders so Air Liquide, an industrial-gases firm, has developed a solar-powered system to generate oxygen.

At night the pilot descends slowly, carefully using up the power until dawn. Once the sun returns the batteries can recharge in three hours as the plane ascends again. Landings are also left until the early evening, when winds are light.

“We want to show that with clean technologies, a passionate team and a far-reaching pioneering vision one can achieve the impossible,” said Piccard  at last month’s announcement of the Solar Impulse Across America trip. “If we all challenge certitudes by driving change and being pioneers in our everyday lives, we can create innovative solutions for society’s biggest challenges.”

Ross Aimer, CEO of Aero Consulting Experts, told ABC News that he believes Solar Impulse’s Across America flight is “a big step, but also a baby step.“When it comes to a commercial craft, you would need more power. … You’d probably need something like two football fields of solar panels,”  said Aimer, a retired United Airlines captain.

But the flight expert is confident. Seeing advances in solar flights and some new airplanes using  biofuel encourages Aimer. “Anything to get us away from burning kerosene,” he said. Some commercial planes are already using electric battery backup systems, although that technology is still in its early stages, Aimer said.

“Hopefully, the [Across America] flight will get some people’s attention. I’m optimistic that the future can be solar and electric,” said Aimer.

The next Solar Impulse challenge is to fly around the world, the attempt is already slated for 2015. This will be much more challenging due to long ocean flights, the pilot will have to fly non-stop for five-to-six days at a time only catnapping for 20 minutes at a time. Therefore to give  the pilots Piccard and Borschberg  room to exercise and lie down, the next aircraft will be about 15% bigger than the prototype, which tips the scales at just 1,600kg (3,527lb).  The Solar Impulse’s ultimate range will be limited by the physical ability of the pilot to remain alert, with little room to move or to store much food and water. With current technology, the team reckon, a two-person solar plane would be too heavy so the pilots will take turns to fly the aircraft.

The ability to stay awake for long periods of time will be vital as installing a  full autopilot system is currently unfeasible due to its weight. However, Altran, an engineering consultancy based in France and one of the project’s supporters, is developing a partial system. In calm weather, it will keep the aircraft pointing in the right direction. And if turbulence causes a wing to dip by more than five degrees, a cuff on the pilot’s right or left arm will vibrate to tell him which way to correct course. He must react quickly to keep control. This system will be tried out on the prototype flight in America.

Sources include: New Scientist, BBC, The Economist, solarimpulse.com

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New LED lamp prototype set to dramatically reduce carbon emissions

April 12, 2013

Consumer appliances giant Philips has unveiled a new prototype LED lamp, which they claim to be the ‘world’s most energy-efficient’ light.

The Dutch company said that the prototype, which is not expected to go on the market for another two years, is twice as effective as equivalent fluorescent lighting currently used in offices and industry buildings across the globe, indicating that the LED lamp could potentially revolutionise lighting systems worldwide.

Light-emitting diodes, or LEDs, have come a long way from their initial use as standby lights on televisions and other electronic devices. Long gone are the days when LEDs were only available in red, technological advances in recent years have allowed manufacturers to produce LEDs of many colours, including white (by mixing red, green and blue LEDs), and of much greater intensity than those found on our TV remote controls.

LEDs are much more energy efficient than normal fluorescent lights, such as the tube lights found in many offices, and use up to 90%  less energy than normal bulbs. Some LEDs can last up to 10,000 hours, compared with compact fluorescent lamps (CFLs, 15,000 hours) and traditional incandescent lightbulbs (a mere 1,000 hours). The use of LED lighting, rather than fluorescent or incandescent lighting is an attractive prospect, as it would significantly reduce maintenance bills, even though it would cost more to fit the LED lamps. Additionally, efficiency is higher in LED lights as they tend to lose less energy through heat than traditional incandescent bulbs.

Rene van Schooten, chief executive of light source and electronics at Philips, said “This is a major breakthrough in LED lighting and will further drive the transformation of the lighting industry. It’s exciting to imagine the massive energy and cost savings it will bring to our planet and customers.”

Lighting accounts for 19% of all energy produced globally, and Fluorescent tube lighting used in offices and industry accounts for over half of this, and it is this market that Philips are initially targeting with their LED lamp. The US alone devours a massive 200 terawatts of energy each year through lighting, and Philips estimate that their new LED lamp could reduce electricity costs by $12 billion annually, and prevent 60 million metric tonnes of damaging carbon dioxide being released into the atmosphere. LED lights are, however, much more expensive than traditional fluorescent and incandescent lighting.

Philips expects the light to be on the market in 2015, and whilst it will initially be used to replace lighting in offices and industry, where lighting is often left switched on twenty-four hours a day. The ultimate aim, however, is to see the LED light used in the home, and a huge leap forward in carbon emissions reduction.

Sources include The Huffington Post, BBC News

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TJC offers an extensive global network of professional & experienced multilingual translators, proof-readers and interpreters. We also have academic researchers, specialists and speakers, who are all native speakers of over 180 languages. At TJC Global, we are committed to helping the effort to reduce global warming. Our expert translators can assist you in research for the carbon market and communication with foreign companies to support the process.

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