Eco farming: not just another chic label

No pesticides, no chemicals, no unnecessary destruction of animal habitats: all aspects that find themselves at the core of eco-farming. In a society where sales of organic produce have rocketed, with most supermarket chains now stocking organic lines, eco-farming seems to have arrived in its golden era.  However, according to The Guardian, this week the Scottish government announced a cut of £25million to the eco-farming industry, with a warning that further reductions in funding are to be made over the coming year.

On one hand the reasons for these cuts are clear: while the health and environmental benefits of eco farming are now widely recognised, the fact remains that eco-farming is not as cost efficient or productive as the new industrial farming methods of today. In recent decades the widespread use of farm machinery has brought in the use of larger fields. You only have to visit an arable farming region of the UK such as East Anglia, to see great expanses of crops stretching as far as the eye can see. This, coupled with the introduction of pesticides, has led to a huge increase in agricultural yields, as crops are being produced on a larger scale, resistant to disease and damaging pests.

However, it cannot be denied that these farming methods bring their own problems to the mix. Hedgerows that previously divided land into smaller manageable fields begin to disappear as does the wildlife and wild flowers that live in this undergrowth. Furthermore, as well as killing off the pests that form an essential part of the natural ecosystem and local food chain, these chemicals also pollute surrounding water sources, causing rivers to become overgrown with algae and plant life, diminishing the population of fish and amphibians… Enter the benefits of eco farming.

Indeed eco farming does not only eliminates many of the negative impacts of a more industrial type of farming, but can also help in a global move towards sustainability. Both the BBC and The Guardian have reported over the last few years how eco farming can boost the output of some of the world’s poorest countries, offering farming methods that are not dependent on the use of expensive chemicals and machinery.

While eco farming remains a vogue in the UK and most of Europe, and not a necessity, it is perhaps important that it is not abandoned and left to fade away into the background. Environmental and health benefits aside, fostering of eco farming projects in developed countries also has the potential to benefit those who simply have no alternative.

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Here at TJC Global we offer a range of translation and interpreting services for environmental, agricultural, aquaculture, agroforestry and agricultural engineering work. Our translators and interpreters are familiar and experienced with the issues and terminology regarding several areas in this field, including agriculture and trade, environmental technologies and sustainable development, water conservation as well as environmental law. For further information please visit our websites at TJC Global  TJC Oxford, or contact us directly by email.

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