Clean, green wave machine: new marine energy park opens in Scotland

Pentland Firth: previously an empty stretch of water joining mainland Scotland with the Orkney Islands, yesterday became home to a new marine energy park. The largest of its kind in the world, the park promises a formidable output of marine energy that could turn the UK’s energy network and economy on its head to give way to a prosperous, more carbon- free future. An image of wealth and promise in the year 2035, opened the article entitled British Sea Power, which appeared yesterday in The Sunday Times, suggesting the huge potential that this new marine park offers to Scotland and the rest of the UK both in terms of economic revival and a step closer to greener electricity on the eve of the marine energy park’s opening.

The marine energy park is the work of the European Marine Energy Centre (EMEC), formed nine years ago in order to promote European research into wave and tidal energy. In contrast to other renewable energy resources such as wind or solar, marine power, especially tidal, is very reliable and, for an island nation a natural port of call in catering for the country’s energy demand, in what Greg Barker the minister for energy and climate change claimed in the Sunday Times to be a “no- brainer for the UK”. This point of view was perhaps also evident in the 10% cut to the government funding of wind farms last week, as marine energy parks such as that now operating in Pentland Firth, pose a significant challenge to the use of other energy resources. After the pledge of £20m of funding for marine energy from the government in April, the EMEC was able to finance this latest marine energy project, allowing it to be up and running today, kick-starting the vogue and viability of marine power for many other energy suppliers.

Marine energy, according to the EMEC website, has huge potential for the UK energy market, capable of producing up to 27GW of power by 2050, the same energy output as eight coal-fired power stations.  Clean, green, with the potential to increase British manufacturing output and employment, marine energy could therefore be the key to a more sustainable future both in the UK and Europe.

News sources: Sunday Times Article: “British Sea Power”: Michael Hanlon and Jonathan Leake, BBC news online, the EMEC website

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Here at TJC Global we offer a range of translation and interpreting services for renewable energy- related work. Our translators and interpreters are familiar and experienced with the issues and terminology regarding several parts of this field, including carbon emissions, climate change, environmental technologies, sustainable development and also environmental law. For further information please visit our websites at either TJC Global or TJC Oxford, or contact us directly by email.

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