“No more Nukes!”: Japan’s nuclear dilemma

More than a year on from the nuclear disaster in Fukushima in March 2011, concerns deepen  in Japan as the prospect that the country will once again revert to nuclear power as a principal national energy source looms on the horizon.  Still fresh in the memory of many Japanese citizens, the Fukushima disaster and its consequences form a central point of conflict when it comes to many government policies regarding the proposed switch-on of nuclear plants, as many people fear a repetition of last year’s catastrophic events.

Since the reopening of the Oi nuclear power plant (near Fukushima) at the beginning of this month, thousands have taken to the streets in the capital in protest, bearing banners bearing the words “No Nukes!”.  The protest in Yoyogi Park in central Tokyo on 16th July this year represented one of largest of these protests and was reported to have continued throughout the day, despite the stifling summer weather in the city. The Japanese police have been present at such protests in Tokyo and on certain occasions have intervened. However, despite the large number of people present there appears to have been few reports of violence by the protesters themselves.

Concerns regarding the Japanese nuclear switch-on could also be fuelled by recent reports of dishonest radiation level recordings in the Fukushima plant after the disaster and the results of a government enquiry into the safety of Japan’s other, currently inactive, nuclear power plants. In particular this report appeared skeptical about the plants’ capacity to withstand a disaster such as that at Fukushima, if history were to repeat itself.

As Japan emerges from the wake of last year’s nuclear catastrophe, it is perhaps difficult to reconcile a need to move beyond what has happened and the need to approach Japan’s energy needs. At the moment it appears, by evidence of the large scale rallies and protests, that many people are keener to err on the side of caution. For example, with the reopening of the beaches near the Fukushima plant early last week, a sobering reminder of the dangers of the radiation emitted by the plant after the tsunami was put in place as radiation readings were set to be shown twice a day, as reassurance but also a means of recollection for those who have now dipped their toes back in the water.

News sources: Labornet Japan, The Guardian online, BBC News website

…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….

At The Japanese Connection, we have over twenty five years’ experience in providing professional, accurate and reliable Japanese interpreters and translators working in a wide range of fields. Whether it is for a conference, a deposition or a trip to Japan with a Japanese business partner, we can offer you a high-quality Japanese language service tailored to meet your individual interpreting or translation needs. For more information and for a free quick quote, please visit our website or contact us.

We also have professional interpreters and translators specialising in the field of nuclear engineering.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: